Lesson 22 of 21
In Progress

5.2: How many questions do law professors ask?

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Goals

  • See how professors actually lead a discussion of a case in class so you understand how to focus your own case reading.
  • Notice the kind and amount of questions asked in class.
  • Practice listening to a law professor lead a class.

 

Instructions

  1. Watch the video below from 03:07 until about 16:30 (about 13 minutes total.) In the video, a law professor discusses the Lefkowitz case with his students.
  2. Try to count how many questions the professor asks and how many questions the students ask.
  3. Don’t worry about getting the number exactly right. We will continue working with this video on the next page as well.
  4. Note: If you need help understanding the professor, you can see the subtitles by clicking “CC.” If you use the subtitles, then try listening one more time without the subtitles. That will really help improve your listening! 

 

Video of Lefkowitz Class Discussion

[Video is set to start at 03:00. Watch up until 16:30.]

From YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gy184UvzJRU


“UVA Law professor George Geis discusses issues surrounding offers and acceptance in contract law with his 1L Contracts class. Taking place early in students’ first semester at law school, this session examined questions surrounding what exactly constitutes an offer of a contract, and what constitutes an acceptance of that offer. Geis illustrated these concepts using historical examples of advertising offers. (University of Virginia School of Law, March 2, 2020)”

 Questions

  • Write your answers in a separate document or on a piece of paper.
  1. How many questions did you hear from the professor?
  2. How many questions did you hear from the students?

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